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literacy and digital age literacy:

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literacy and digital age literacy:

Post by uzma dawood on Tue Oct 26, 2010 9:49 pm

need your thoughts about all this ??? literacy and digital age literacy... and remember its a discussion and still you all are just postings posts not busy in discussions...
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Re: literacy and digital age literacy:

Post by rao muhammad naveed on Wed Oct 27, 2010 3:33 pm






"We are living in a new economy-powered by technology, fueled by information, and driven by knowledge. The influence of technology will go beyond new equipment and faster communications, as work and skills will be redefined and reorganized."

—U.S. Department of Labor, 1999,
Futurework—Trends and Challenges for Work in the 21st Century

The skill sets for the 21st C are mutating rapidly but they are falling into 4 categories identified by the North Central Regional Educational Laborartory (NCREL)

1. Digital-Age Literacy
2. Inventive Thinking
3. Effective Communication & Decision Making
4. Quality, State-of-the-Art Results

Literacies include tasks such as:

Information Literacy: The ability to search for and hence access appropriate information across a range of genre, formats and systems. The ability to sift, scan and sort information.

Technological Literacy: The innate ability to discover how a new or evolved technology operates; recognising its limitations and benefits. The ability to choose the most appropriate tool to access and process information and present new knowledge & understanding.

Scientific Literacy: The ability to apply the scientific process and have an awreness of scientific terminology and their applications.

Media Literacy: The ability to synthesise a wide range of viewpoints/interpretations from a variety of media and build a concise model of understanding of those ideas.

Cultural Literacy & Global Awareness: The ability to manage information in the “global village”.

Critical Literacy: The ability to identify key aspects of information validity such as accuracy, objectivity, authority, currency and coverage.

Cognitive Literacy: The capacity to build cognitive models/frameworks of understanding.

Visual Literacy: The ability to interpret and present information in a range of visual formats. This may include, animations,



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Re: literacy and digital age literacy:

Post by khuram on Wed Oct 27, 2010 11:06 pm

Literacy has traditionally been described as the ability to read and write. ... ability to use computers and other digital technologies Since...New literacies generally refers to new forms of literacy made possible by digital ... spaces where fans of all ages, but especially adolescents ..Digital literacy is the ability to locate, organize, understand, evaluate, and ... Seek Information in the Digital Age....Literacy and Education: Educational ... telecom, datacom and digital exchanges, excellent infrastructure availability and backup support. ..

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Digital Age Literacy

Post by malikfurqan on Thu Oct 28, 2010 10:14 pm

"We are living in a new economy-powered by technology, fueled by information, and driven by knowledge. The influence of technology will go beyond new equipment and faster communications, as work and skills will be redefined and reorganized."

Very Happy Literacies include tasks such as:

Information Literacy: The ability to search for and hence access appropriate information across a range of genre, formats and systems. The ability to sift, scan and sort information.

Technological Literacy: The innate ability to discover how a new or evolved
technology operates; recognising its limitations and benefits. The ability to choose the most appropriate tool to access and
process information and present new knowledge & understanding.

Scientific Literacy: The ability to apply the scientific process and have an awreness of scientific terminology and their applications.

Media Literacy: The ability to synthesise a wide range of viewpoints/interpretations from a variety of media and build a concise model of understanding of those ideas.

Cultural Literacy & Global Awareness: The ability to manage information in the “global village”.

Critical Literacy: The ability to identify key aspects of information validity such as accuracy, objectivity, authority, currency and coverage.

Cognitive Literacy: The capacity to build cognitive models/frameworks of understanding.

Visual Literacy: The ability to interpret and present information in a range of visual formats. This may include, animations,

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Re: literacy and digital age literacy:

Post by Ali on Fri Oct 29, 2010 10:39 am

khuram wrote:Literacy has traditionally been described as the ability to read and write. ... ability to use computers and other digital technologies Since...New literacies generally refers to new forms of literacy made possible by digital ... spaces where fans of all ages, but especially adolescents ..Digital literacy is the ability to locate, organize, understand, evaluate, and ... Seek Information in the Digital Age....Literacy and Education: Educational ... telecom, datacom and digital exchanges, excellent infrastructure availability and backup support. ..

Short One , but describes the whole...
good work khuram
keep it up !

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Re: literacy and digital age literacy:

Post by Ali on Fri Oct 29, 2010 10:59 am

Digital Literacy
The notion of literacy is important in enabling skills to be placed within a context of meaning and social action. Claire Bélisle (2006) characterises the evolution of literacy concepts in terms of three models. The functional model views literacy as the mastery of simple cognitive and practical skills, and ranges from the simple view of literacy as the mechanical skills of reading and writing to a more developed approach (evinced by e.g. UNESCO, 2006) regarding literacy as the skills required to function effectively within the community. The socio-cultural practice model takes as its basis that the concept of literacy is only meaningful in terms of its social context, and that to be literate is to have access to cultural, economic and political structures of society; in this sense, as Brian Street (1984) has asserted, literacy is ideological. The intellectual empowerment model argues that:
Literacy not only provides means and skills to deal with written texts and numbers within specific cultural and ideological contexts, but it brings a profound enrichment and eventually entails a transformation of human thinking capacities. This intellectual empowerment happens whenever mankind endows itself with new cognitive tools, such as writing, or with new technical instruments, such as those that digital technology has made possible. (Bélisle, 2006: 54-55)
In viewing literacy within the context of a digitally-infused society as, at one level functional, at another socially engaged, and at a third as transformative, we can see it as a powerful tool for the individual and the group to understand their own relationship to the digital, that is, to be aware of the role of the digital in their own development, and to control it, that is, to place the digital at the disposal of their own goals and visions.
The term digital literacy was popularised by Paul Gilster, who, in his book of the same name defined it as:
the ability to understand and use information in multiple formats from a wide range of sources when it is presented via computers. The concept of literacy goes beyond simply being able to read; it has always meant the ability to read with meaning, and to understand. It is the fundamental act of cognition. Digital literacy likewise extends the boundaries of definition. It is cognition of what you see on the computer screen when you use the networked medium. It places demands upon you that were always present, though less visible, in the analog media of newspaper and TV. At the same time, it conjures up a new set of challenges that require you to approach networked computers without preconceptions. Not only must you acquire the skill of finding things, you must also acquire the ability to use these things in your life. (Gilster, 1997: 1-2)
Gilster identifies critical thinking rather than technical competence as the core element of digital literacy, and emphasises the critical evaluation of what is found on the Web, rather than the technical skills required to access it. He also emphasises, in the last sentence, the relevant usage of skills “in your life”, that digital literacy is more than skills or competences.
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Re: literacy and digital age literacy:

Post by asma mahmood on Fri Oct 29, 2010 5:18 pm

Traditionally literacy has been commonly defined as the ability to read and write at an adequate level of proficiency that is necessary for communication. More recently however, literacy has taken on several meanings. Technological literacy, mathematical literacy, and visual literacy are just a few examples. While it may be difficult to gauge the degree to which literacy has an impact on an individual’s overall happiness, one can easily infer that an increase in literacy will lead to the improvement of an individual’s life and the development of societies.

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Re: literacy and digital age literacy:

Post by Ali on Sat Oct 30, 2010 12:25 am

hmmm, well, i think this one is the best post to describe the literacy..

just the brief description of types of literacy's is missing ....

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Re: literacy and digital age literacy:

Post by asma mahmood on Sat Oct 30, 2010 8:37 am

The digital age is started in second milenium,and it means that every company,shop,or bar,have at least one computer.When we say,this is age of...,first we think,tehnology of that age.Digital age is started,(digital photos,digital computers,digital books,digital airplanes...).The schools have digital structures,(on knowledge i mean),and we do not writing just on paper,we can write on computer,phones,PDA,or somthing like that.A new generations of cars have auto-control,when jou are sleepy.

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Re: literacy and digital age literacy:

Post by Ali on Sat Oct 30, 2010 8:41 am

asma mahmood wrote:The digital age is started in second milenium,and it means that every company,shop,or bar,have at least one computer.When we say,this is age of...,first we think,tehnology of that age.Digital age is started,(digital photos,digital computers,digital books,digital airplanes...).The schools have digital structures,(on knowledge i mean),and we do not writing just on paper,we can write on computer,phones,PDA,or somthing like that.A new generations of cars have auto-control,when jou are sleepy.

so According to you, digital age actually started with the idea that every shop,company or bar should have at least one computer?
then what ? now i think every company, shop and bar is having a computer, (ignore rare chances), is this what digital age is ?

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Re: literacy and digital age literacy:

Post by tariq aziz on Mon Nov 01, 2010 5:42 am

"We are living in a new economy-powered by technology, fueled by information, and driven by knowledge. The influence of technology will go beyond new equipment and faster communications, as work and skills will be redefined and reorganized.

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Re: literacy and digital age literacy:

Post by tariq aziz on Mon Nov 01, 2010 5:43 am

Literacies include tasks such as:

Information Literacy: The ability to search for and hence access appropriate information across a range of genre, formats and systems. The ability to sift, scan and sort information.

Technological Literacy: The innate ability to discover how a new or evolved technology operates; recognising its limitations and benefits. The ability to choose the most appropriate tool to access and process information and present new knowledge & understanding.

Scientific Literacy: The ability to apply the scientific process and have an awreness of scientific terminology and their applications.

Media Literacy: The ability to synthesise a wide range of viewpoints/interpretations from a variety of media and build a concise model of understanding of those ideas.

Cultural Literacy & Global Awareness: The ability to manage information in the “global village”.

Critical Literacy: The ability to identify key aspects of information validity such as accuracy, objectivity, authority, currency and coverage.

Cognitive Literacy: The capacity to build cognitive models/frameworks of understanding.

Visual Literacy: The ability to interpret and present information in a range of visual formats. This may include, animations,



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Re: literacy and digital age literacy:

Post by tariq aziz on Mon Nov 01, 2010 5:45 am

Texts and Literacy in the Digital Age is a two-day conference jointly organised by the Leiden University (Book and Digital Media Studies), LIBER, Tiele-Stichting and the Koninklijke Bibliotheek (National Library of the Netherlands) to be held on 16 and 17 December at the Koninklijke Bibliotheek in The Hague, Netherlands.

The conference will bring prominent and inspiring speakers together in order to address the changes in scholarly communication within the humanities and social sciences, and more importantly, what these changes mean to authors, intermediaries and users.


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Re: literacy and digital age literacy:

Post by warda on Mon Nov 01, 2010 5:45 am

whats the reasons of low litrecy rate in our greate pakistan

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Rukhsana Anwer

Post by Rukhsana Anwer on Mon Nov 01, 2010 5:47 am

What is Digital Literacy?
• A person’s ability to perform tasks effectively in a digital environment... Literacy includes the ability to read and interpret media, to reproduce data and images through digital manipulation, and to evaluate and apply new knowledge gained from digital environments

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Re: literacy and digital age literacy:

Post by warda on Mon Nov 01, 2010 5:51 am

How we can increase our litrecy rate with the help of ict please give me your views ?reply me must

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Re: literacy and digital age literacy:

Post by Abdul Nasir on Mon Nov 01, 2010 5:53 am

Media has become a staple in contemporary life. The Internet, video games, and television are all common instruments to people young and old. But what happens when the young sacrifice some of their learning for these modern conveniences? In Literacy in the Digital Age: Reading, Writing, Viewing, and Computing, Withrow discusses the impact of technology on education, and more specifically on a child's developing literacy. Children are not only responsible for cultivating literacy through reading and writing, they also need to be conversant through computers, television, and other digital media.

A literate student needs to be able to comprehend material that is laden with varying levels of difficult vocabulary. Withrow discusses the process of developing phonemic awareness and vocabulary. An advanced vocabulary aids in reading and writing simultaneously. An expansive bank of words allows children to express themselves creatively. Similarly, the general public has been influenced by technology and its vocabulary. With the broadcasts of NASA lift offs and the popularity of weather reports, the general population has become conversant with new vocabulary. Due to the effects of this exposure, Withrow reminds the reader again that it is an adult's duty to monitor and explain what children see on television.......

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Re: literacy and digital age literacy:

Post by Afsheen Sharif on Mon Nov 01, 2010 5:55 am

Media literacy has come of age. In a society as mass mediated and media saturated as our own, communication technologies are at the core of the political, economic and cultural environments.


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Re: literacy and digital age literacy:

Post by ayesha on Mon Nov 01, 2010 5:56 am

As society changes, the skills needed to negotiate the complexities of life also change. In the early 1900s, a
person who had acquired simple reading, writing, and calculating skills was considered literate. Only in recent
years has the public education system expected all students to build on those basics, developing a broader range
of literacies (International ICT Literacy Panel, 2002). To achieve success in the 21st century, students also need to
attain proficiency in science, technology, and culture, as well as gain a thorough understanding of information
in all its forms.
Digital-Age Literacy includes the following:
• Basic Literacy: Language proficiency (in English) and numeracy at levels necessary to function on the job and in
society to achieve one’s goals and to develop one’s knowledge and potential in this Digital Age.
• Scientific Literacy: Knowledge and understanding of the scientific concepts and processes required for personal
decision making, participation in civic and cultural affairs, and economic productivity.
• Economic Literacy: The ability to identify economic problems, alternatives, costs, and benefits; analyze the
incentives at work in economic situations; examine the consequences of changes in economic conditions and
public policies; collect and organize economic evidence; and weigh costs against benefits.
• Technological Literacy: Knowledge about what technology is, how it works, what purposes it can serve,
and how it can be used efficiently and effectively to achieve specific goals.
• Visual Literacy: The ability to interpret, use, appreciate, and create images and video using both conventional
and 21st century media in ways that advance thinking, decision making, communication, and learning.
• Information Literacy: The
ability to evaluate information
across a range of media;
recognize when information
is needed; locate, synthesize,
and use information effectively;
and accomplish these
functions using technology,
communication networks,
and electronic resources.
• Multicultural Literacy:
The ability to understand and
appreciate the similarities and
differences in the customs,
values, and beliefs of one’s
own culture and the cultures
of others.
• Global Awareness: The
recognition and understanding
of interrelationships among
international organizations,
nation-states, public and private
economic entities, sociocultural
groups, and individuals across
the globe.

Digital-Age Literacy

Basic, Scientific, Economic,
and Technological Literacies

Visual and Information Literacies

Multicultural Literacy and
Global Awareness
Inventive Thinking

Adaptability, Managing
Complexity, and Self-Direction

Curiosity, Creativity,
and Risk Taking

Higher-Order Thinking and
Sound Reasoning
Effective Communication

Teaming, Collaboration,
and Interpersonal Skills

Personal, Social,
and Civic Responsibility

Interactive Communication
High Productivity

Prioritizing, Planning, and
Managing for Results

Effective Use of Real-World Tools

Ability to Produce Relevant,
High-Quality Products
21st Century Learning
Basic Literacy
Basic literacy is language proficiency (in English) and numeracy at levels of proficiency necessary to
function on the job and in society to achieve one’s goals and to develop one’s knowledge and potential in
this Digital Age.
Students Who Have
Basic Literacy Skills:
In Relation to Language Proficiency
• Meet standards for the following areas in the context
of traditional and media-based prose*, documents**,
and communication venues encountered in
everyday living:
– Reading – Writing
– Listening – Speaking
In Relation to Numeracy (Quantitative Literacy)
• Meet standards for the following areas in the
context of traditional and media-based prose*,
documents**, and communication venues
encountered in everyday living:
– Arithmetic computing
– Mathematical reasoning and problem solving
In Relation to Information and
Technological Literacy
• Meet standards for the following areas in the
context of traditional and media-based prose*,
documents**, and communication venues
encountered in everyday living:
– Recognizing when information is needed
– Locating information
– Evaluating all forms of information
– Synthesizing and using information effectively
* Prose includes (but is not limited to) literature, editorials,
newspaper articles, poems, and stories
** Documents include print and media-based artifacts, such
as job applications, bus schedules, maps, checks, tax forms,
and tables.
Digitization blurs the lines between text, voice, video,
and data. Now they’re all just packets of electronic
information across global networks. The interpretation
of such multimedia communiqués belies the question:
What constitutes basic literacy in the Digital Age?
Basic literacy—the ability to read, write, listen, and
speak—is more important than ever, and the definition
of basic literacy has changed over time to reflect that
increasing importance. In the early 1900s, basic literacy
meant the ability to write one’s name. That definition
was later expanded to mean the decoding of text,
and by the 1930s it had come to include reading
and expressing oneself through writing (Bransford
et al., 1999).
The National Literacy Act of 1991 defined literacy
as “an individual’s ability to read, write, and speak
in English, and compute and solve problems at levels
of proficiency necessary to function on the job and
in society to achieve one’s goals, and develop one’s
knowledge and potential” (National Literacy Act
of 1991, Sec. 3).
The National Assessment of Adult Literacy
measures basic adult literacy along three scales—
prose, document, and quantitative—composed of
literacy tasks that simulate the types of demands that
adults encounter in everyday life. Prose literacy tasks
include understanding and using information from
texts such as editorials, newspaper articles, poems,
and stories. Document literacy tasks include locating
and using information found in common artifacts such
as job applications, bus schedules, maps, payroll forms,
indexes, and tables. Quantitative literacy tasks include
performing arithmetic operations required as prose
and documents encountered in everyday life (e.g., bank
deposit slips, checkbooks, order forms, loan applications)
(National Center for Education Statistics, 2003).
The authors of Digital Transformation, a recent report
published by the Educational Testing Service’s Center
for Global Assessment, define today’s literacy as the
ability to use “digital technology, communications tools,
and/or networks to access, manage, integrate, evaluate,
and create information in order to function in a knowledge
society” (International ICT Literacy Panel, 2002,
p. 2). In other words, although reading, writing, listening,
and speaking are paramount, today’s students
must be able to decipher meaning and express ideas
through a range of media.






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Re: literacy and digital age literacy:

Post by Afsheen Sharif on Mon Nov 01, 2010 5:58 am

How will digital technologies change our culture in the years to come? In what ways will they shape how we read and learn, what we read and learn, even if we read and learn?

These are big questions, but they’re the kind we like to ask here on the blog. Next week we’ll ask them again in yet another way, when we publish a series of posts (one each day) broadly centering on the fate of the written word and the institutions that minister to it in the age of the Internet, Kindle, and “the cloud.”


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Re: literacy and digital age literacy:

Post by ayesha on Mon Nov 01, 2010 5:59 am

Technological Literacy
Technological literacy is knowledge about what technology is, how it works, what purposes it can serve,
and how it can be used efficiently and effectively to achieve specific goals.
Students Who Are
Technologically Literate:
• Demonstrate a sound conceptual understanding
of the nature of technology systems and view
themselves as proficient users of these systems.
• Understand and model positive, ethical use of
technology in both social and personal contexts.
• Use a variety of technology tools in effective ways
to increase creative productivity.
• Use communication tools to reach out to the world
beyond the classroom and communicate ideas in
powerful ways.
• Use technology effectively to access, evaluate, process
and synthesize information from a variety of sources.
• Use technology to identify and solve complex
problems in real-world contexts.
Just 20 years ago, cell phones, laptops, pagers, and
fax machines were in the realm of scientists and
science fiction. Today, those technologies and the
Internet have gained widespread public acceptance
and use. It is clear that, in today’s Digital Age, students
must be technologically literate to live, learn, and work
successfully. The No Child Left Behind Act requires
participating states to strive for technological literacy
by all eighth graders (No Child Left Behind Act of 2001,
Part D, Sec. 2402).
Most schools acknowledge the importance of
technology to their students’ futures, but to date
few have successfully incorporated technology into
the mainstream of academic learning (Pearson &
Young, 2002, pp. 104-105). While E-Rate (federal
discounts for school infrastructure) monies have
enabled schools to make significant gains in building
the technical infrastructure required, the shifts in policy
and practice needed to ensure that all students learn
to use technology effectively have been more difficult
to achieve.
National standards and guidelines have been developed
for K–12 students’ technological literacy. The
National Educational Technology Standards (NETS)
for students, developed by the International Society
for Technology in Education’s (ISTE, 2000), are widely
accepted by K–12 schools. The profile on the left
includes the six categories into which the 14 NETS
standards are classified.
In addition to the NETS standards for students, the
Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary
Skills (SCANS) report and the American Association
of School Administrators include competency in the
use of computers and other technologies as an essential
skill for students in the 21st century (SCANS, 1992;
Uchida, Cetron, & McKenzie, 1996).
These reports assert that technological literacy is an
essential component of job readiness, citizenry, and
life skills. Students must not only become competent
in the use of technology and associated applications,
they also must be able to apply their skills to practical
situations. Most experts agree that students should
develop technological skills in the context of learning
and solving problems related to academic content
(Baker & O’Neil, 2003).
enGauge 21st Century Skills: Literacy in the Digital Age




sadia saleem

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Re: literacy and digital age literacy:

Post by Ali on Mon Nov 01, 2010 10:28 pm

warda wrote:How we can increase our litrecy rate with the help of ict please give me your views ?reply me must

Recently, there has been a remarkable increase in the level of Information and Communications Technology (ICT) re-sourcings. ICT has its importance in supporting the agenda to improve standards across the school curriculum. Developments in information and communication technologies are starting to make it possible to use the tools for assisting the process of learning beyond the boundaries of the classroom. In addition, their use will start to prepare learners for participation in a networked, information society where knowledge is the most critical resource for personal, social and economical development. Information and communications technology have a massive contribution to make to all aspects of this reform agenda. For example, it can make a significant contribution to teaching and learning across all subjects and ages, inside and outside the curriculum. It can provide opportunities to engage and motivate children and young people and meet their individual learning needs. It can help link school and home by providing access to teaching and learning materials, and to assessment and attendance data, from home. ICT can enable schools to share information and good practice in networked learning communities’ intelligent information management systems within schools can support school leadership. The technological changes which we are experiencing are extraordinary. Much of what is commonly used in schools today didn''t even exist 10 years ago and of course in next 10 years many new advanced technologies are coming in education. There are two major initiatives in the public school system at present involving literacy and technology. The goal of the technology initiative is to ensure that all students and staff have ready access to information technology. The literacy initiative is designed to refocus instructional practices to ensure that all students attain a high level of literacy as they progress throughout the education system. Local, provincial, and federal agencies have increased technology funding; departments of education have developed ambitious statewide plans; more schools enjoy access to hardware, software, and the Internet; and educators are developing more ways to apply technology to improve student learning. Therefore, ICT needs to be seen as a key, integral element of the school reform agenda, freeing up time and energy to help remodel the school team, enabling efficient knowledge management within schools, supporting knowledge transfer between schools and outreach to parents and the community, as well as being a largely powerful medium for transforming teaching and learning.

Reference:

http://www.shvoong.com/social-sciences/1671512-increasing-role-technology-education/

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Re: literacy and digital age literacy:

Post by Ali on Mon Nov 01, 2010 10:37 pm

Afsheen Sharif wrote:How will digital technologies change our culture in the years to come? In what ways will they shape how we read and learn, what we read and learn, even if we read and learn?

These are big questions, but they’re the kind we like to ask here on the blog. Next week we’ll ask them again in yet another way, when we publish a series of posts (one each day) broadly centering on the fate of the written word and the institutions that minister to it in the age of the Internet, Kindle, and “the cloud.”


HOW DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES HAVE CHANGED OUR CULTURE

The constant changing of culture is undeniably promoted by the advancement of technology and the social judgment of that. Several decades ago the appearance of colored televisions and later the video tape recorders constituted a huge sensation. The situation is the same with the mass usage of computers. The spread of broadband internet caused a cultural revolution. Due to the technological revolution almost all segments of the life have undergone a major transformation in the past few decades. Digital technologies made possible time, space and energy saving activities through replacing analogue technologies. Digital technologies have heavily affected one of the cornerstones of culture, namely the intellectual creative activity. The spread of digital world had at least two important consequences: on the one hand intellectual creations may be manipulated in an unlimited amount and in unchanged quality. On the other hand due to the evolution of digital networks the distribution of and access to the works has changed too: it became easier, faster and more effective. These changes arm in arm with the phenomena of globalization have generally changed the traditional forms of human communication. Nowadays people can’t imagine their life without digital technologies. The social networking sites, chat rooms, blogs, podcasts, e-newspapers, or streaming of TV or radio programs are great example for this.

Reference:

http://www.allacademic.com/meta/p_mla_apa_research_citation/4/0/7/6/7/p407677_index.html

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