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Education in Pakistan

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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by tariq aziz on Tue Oct 26, 2010 7:40 am

muneeba hassan wrote:Female Education in pakistan.
Comparison of data for men and women reveals significant disparity in educational attainment. By 1992, among people older than fifteen years of age, 22 percent of women were literate, compared with 49 percent of men. The comparatively slow rate of improvement for women is reflected in the fact that between 1980 and 1989, among women aged fifteen to twenty-four, 25 percent were literate. United Nations sources say that in 1990 for every 100 girls of primary school age there were only thirty in school; among girls of secondary school age, only thirteen out of 100 were in school; and among girls of the third level, grades nine and ten, only 1.5 out of 100 were in school. Slightly higher estimates by the National Education Council for 1990 stated that 2.5 percent of students--3 percent of men and 2 percent of women- -between the ages of seventeen and twenty-one were enrolled at the degree level. Among all people over twenty-five in 1992, women averaged a mere 0.7 year of schooling compared with an average of 2.9 years for men.

The discrepancy between rural and urban areas is even more marked. In 1981 only 7 percent of women in rural areas were literate, compared with 35 percent in urban areas. Among men, these rates were 27 and 57 percent, respectively. Pakistan's low female literacy rates are particularly confounding because these rates are analogous to those of some of the poorest countries in the world.

Pakistan has never had a systematic, nationally coordinated effort to improve female primary education, despite its poor standing. It was once assumed that the reasons behind low female school enrollments were cultural, but research conducted by the Ministry for Women's Development and a number of international donor agencies in the 1980s revealed that danger to a woman's honor was parents' most crucial concern. Indeed, reluctance to accept schooling for women turned to enthusiasm when parents in rural Punjab and rural Balochistan could be guaranteed their daughters' safety and, hence, their honor.

how we improve the education in pakistan for female?
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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by khuram on Tue Oct 26, 2010 7:42 am

Education in Pakistan is divided into five levels: primary (grades one through five); middle (grades six through eight); high (grades nine and ten, leading to the Secondary School Certificate); intermediate (grades eleven and twelve, leading to a Higher Secondary School Certificate); and university programs leading to graduate (undergraduate) and advanced (post-graduate) degrees

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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by tariq aziz on Tue Oct 26, 2010 7:44 am

hina khalid wrote:Education is considered as the cheapest defence of a nation. But the down trodden condition of education in Pakistan bears an ample testimony of the fact that it is unable to defend its own sector. Though 62 years have been passed and 23 policies and action plans have been introduced yet the educational sector is waiting for an arrival of a saviour. The government of Pervaiz Musharraf invested heavily in education sector and that era saw a visible positive educational change in Pakistani society. Now a days, the economic situation in Pakistan is under stress and education is the worse effected sector in Pakistan. The Constitution of Islamic Republic of Pakistan says,

“The state of Pakistan shall remove illiteracy and provide free and compulsory secondary education within minimum possible period.”

how education is considered as the cheapest defence of a nation?
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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by warda on Tue Oct 26, 2010 7:44 am

tariq aziz wrote:
warda wrote:education in pakistan incaresing day by day.
please tell me how education increasing day by day?
bcz of awerness of the people

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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by ayesha on Tue Oct 26, 2010 7:45 am

some factor or problem



in edu of pakistan


A variety of research studies have point out the psycho-social problems of the students, teachers, planners and managers working in the public and private sector of education in Pakistan. These problems can be studied under in three domains i.e. home-centered problems, community-centered problems and school-centered problems.

Though, the Quaid-e-Azam, Muhammad Ali Jinnah, in his message delivered in the first Education Meeting 1947, categorically stressed on taking practical steps in reshaping the whole education system of the country, yet the situation regarding the education sector of Pakistan has been very uncertain and critical till yet. The commissions and policies till the recent years have beautifully worked out various strategies and plans for enhancing and changing the set of courses, giving quality education, preparing standard textbooks, resolving the problem of medium of instruction, streamlining the planning and management of the institutions, but due to the policies and reforms without implementation, the mismatch in public and private systems, the teaching of languages only and the polarization and existence of pressure groups have weakened not only the whole education system of Pakistan but the other institutions and organizations also.

Furthermore, it is a fact that the attitudes of teacher, the response of student and the behavior of manager do have a crucial role in making the personality of the individuals and social progress, but in addition to this some physical problems that still exist here are the overcrowded classrooms, insufficient teaching materials, poor staffing, absence of equipped libraries and laboratories, and lack of physical facilities like playgrounds, drinking water, washrooms, recreational, common, medical and retiring rooms and furniture etc. This alarming situation has caused an awkward backwardness of the education system in the country.

Furthermore, besides the system problems as observed, it is obvious that the teachers' problems of insecurity, accommodation, remuneration, political exploitation life threats and deprivation prevent a teacher to play the role of an implementer, prompter, director, guide, counselor, manager, organizer and instructor inside the school and also halt him/her to work outside in the society as a good social.

Unluckily, due to the lack of professional growth and leadership, teacher in Pakistan evidently faces a hurdle in the way toward lifelong and quality education. Most of the teachers are virtually literate and have regressive trends. However, the one room affair, the schools without boundary walls and the negligible participation of community also deteriorate the smooth process of education in Pakistan.

The out of order homes, the social status of parents, poverty, orphanage, divorced families, crowded homes, sibling rivalry problem, family educational background, inferiority complexes, harsh discipline and child labour are also persistently showing their virulent fangs to tear down the learners in our country.



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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by fazal ur rehman on Tue Oct 26, 2010 7:49 am

Education in Pakistan

Education in Pakistan is divided into five levels: primary (grades one through five); middle (grades six through eight); high (grades nine and ten, leading to the Secondary School Certificate); intermediate (grades eleven and twelve, leading to a Higher Secondary School Certificate); and university programs leading to graduate (undergraduate) and advanced (post-graduate) degrees.

All academic education institutions are the responsibility of the provincial governments. The federal government mostly assists in curriculum development, accreditation and some financing of research.

Pre-school

A child may begin his/her schooling at a pre-school at the age of 3. Over the last few years, many new kindergarten (sometimes called montessori) schools have sprung up in Pakistan.

Primary Education

Formal education in Pakistan starts from around age 5. The first 5 years of school are referred to as Primary. Thereafter, the next 3 are referred to as Middle and the 2 after as Highschool

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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by warda on Tue Oct 26, 2010 7:52 am

[quote="warda"]
malikfurqan wrote:Education in Pakistan A White Paper (Revised) -February 2007
- vi -
ACRONYMS
AIOU Allama Iqbal Open University
ABES Adult Basic Education Society
B.A Bachelor of Arts
B.Ed Bachelor of Education
B.Sc Bachelor of Science
CSOs Civil Society Organizations
CT Certificate of Teaching
DA Daily Allowance
ECE Early Childhood Education
ECCE Early Childhood Care and Education
EFA Education for All
EMIS Education Management Information System
ESR Education Sector Reforms
ESRA Education Sector Reforms Assistance (Programme of USAID)
F.A Faculty of Arts
GDP Gross Domestic Product
GTZ German Technical Cooperation
HEC Higher Education Commission
ICT Information Communication Technology
ICT Islamabad Capital Territory
IDSP Institute for Development Studies and Practices
IER Institute of Education and Research
IME Institute of Mass Education
IT Information Technology
Katchi Pre-Primary Class
M.A Master of Arts
MIS Management Information System
MDGs Millennium Development Goals
MoE Ministry of Education
M.Sc Master of Science
NAVTEC National Vocational and Technical Education Commission
NEAS National Education Assessment System
NFBE Non Formal Basic Education
NFE Non Formal Education
NLA National Language Authority
NWFP North West Frontier Province
PACADE Pakistan Association for Continuing Adult Education
Ph.D Doctor of Philosophy
PTC Primary Teaching Certificate
SCSPEB Society for Community Support for Primary Education in Balochistan
TA Travel Allowance
TEVT Technical Education and Vocational Training
TVE Technical and Vocational Education
UDC Upper Division Clerk
UNESCO United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization
plz sumrize ur defination furqan

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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by sobia saleem on Tue Oct 26, 2010 7:53 am


Education in pakistan

At independence, Pakistan had a poorly educated population and few schools or universities. Although the education system has expanded greatly since then, debate continues about the curriculum, and, except in a few elite institutions, quality remained a crucial concern of educators in the early 1990s.

Adult literacy is low, but improving. In 1992 more than 36 percent of adults over fifteen were literate, compared with 21 percent in 1970. The rate of improvement is highlighted by the 50 percent literacy achieved among those aged fifteen to nineteen in 1990. School enrollment also increased, from 19 percent of those aged six to twenty-three in 1980 to 24 percent in 1990. However, by 1992 the population over twenty-five had a mean of only 1.9 years of schooling. This fact explains the minimal criteria for being considered literate: having the ability to both read and write (with understanding) a short, simple statement on everyday life.

Relatively limited resources have been allocated to education, although there has been improvement in recent decades. In 1960 public expenditure on education was only 1.1 percent of the gross national product (GNP); by 1990 the figure had risen to 3.4 percent. This amount compared poorly with the 33.9 percent being spent on defense in 1993. In 1990 Pakistan was tied for fourth place in the world in its ratio of military expenditures to health and education expenditures. Although the government enlisted the assistance of various international donors in the education efforts outlined in its Seventh Five-Year Plan (1988-93), the results did not measure up to expectations.

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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by warda on Tue Oct 26, 2010 7:57 am


At independence, Pakistan had a poorly educated population and few schools or universities. Although the education system has expanded greatly since then, debate continues about the curriculum, and, except in a few elite institutions, quality remained a crucial concern of educators in the early 1990s.

Adult literacy is low, but improving. In 1992 more than 36 percent of adults over fifteen were literate, compared with 21 percent in 1970. The rate of improvement is highlighted by the 50 percent literacy achieved among those aged fifteen to nineteen in 1990. School enrollment also increased, from 19 percent of those aged six to twenty-three in 1980 to 24 percent in 1990. However, by 1992 the population over twenty-five had a mean of only 1.9 years of schooling. This fact explains the minimal criteria for being considered literate: having the ability to both read and write (with understanding) a short, simple statement on everyday life.

Relatively limited resources have been allocated to education, although there has been improvement in recent decades. In 1960 public expenditure on education was only 1.1 percent of the gross national product (GNP); by 1990 the figure had risen to 3.4 percent. This amount compared poorly with the 33.9 percent being spent on defense in 1993. In 1990 Pakistan was tied for fourth place in the world in its ratio of military expenditures to health and education expenditures. Although the government enlisted the assistance of various international donors in the education efforts outlined in its Seventh Five-Year Plan (1988-93), the results did not measure up to expectations


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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by warda on Tue Oct 26, 2010 8:00 am

Pakistan Table of Contents
At independence, Pakistan had a poorly educated population and few schools or universities. Although the education system has expanded greatly since then, debate continues about the curriculum, and, except in a few elite institutions, quality remained a crucial concern of educators in the early 1990s.

Adult literacy is low, but improving. In 1992 more than 36 percent of adults over fifteen were literate, compared with 21 percent in 1970. The rate of improvement is highlighted by the 50 percent literacy achieved among those aged fifteen to nineteen in 1990. School enrollment also increased, from 19 percent of those aged six to twenty-three in 1980 to 24 percent in 1990. However, by 1992 the population over twenty-five had a mean of only 1.9 years of schooling. This fact explains the minimal criteria for being considered literate: having the ability to both read and write (with understanding) a short, simple statement on everyday life.

Relatively limited resources have been allocated to education, although there has been improvement in recent decades. In 1960 public expenditure on education was only 1.1 percent of the gross national product (GNP); by 1990 the figure had risen to 3.4 percent. This amount compared poorly with the 33.9 percent being spent on defense in 1993. In 1990 Pakistan was tied for fourth place in the world in its ratio of military expenditures to health and education expenditures. Although the government enlisted the assistance of various international donors in the education efforts outlined in its Seventh Five-Year Plan (1988-93), the results did not measure up to expectations

Shocked

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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by shaguftaparveen on Tue Oct 26, 2010 8:06 am


ICT brings a change in education in pakistan.
zarmina

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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by uzma dawood on Tue Oct 26, 2010 9:45 pm

Salam
All of you are doing good but i need some more from you people... like creating your own phrases and concepts in discussions.. some have not understood todays discussion and it was all about education system in Pakistan..
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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by sehrish naseer on Fri Oct 29, 2010 4:02 pm


Education in Pakistan is overseen by Ministry of Education of Government of Pakistan. The academic institutions are the responsibility of the provincial governments whereas the federal government mostly assists in curriculum development, accreditation and some financing of research.

The education in Pakistan is generally divided into five levels: primary (grades one through five); middle (grades six through eight); high (grades nine and ten, leading to the Secondary School Certificate or SSC); intermediate (grades eleven and twelve, leading to a Higher Secondary (School) Certificate or HSC); and university programs leading to graduate and advanced degrees.[3]

The literacy rate ranges from 87% in Islamabad to 20% in the Kohlu District[4]. Between 2000—2004, Pakistanis in the age group 55–64 had a literacy rate of almost 30%, those aged between 45–54 had a literacy rate of nearly 40%, those between 25–34 had a literacy rate of 50%, and those aged 15–24 had a literacy rate of more than 60%.[5] These data indicate that, with every passing generation, the literacy rate in Pakistan has risen by around 10%. Literacy rates vary regionally, particularly by sex. In tribal areas female literacy is 7.5%.[6] Moreover, English is fast spreading in Pakistan, with 18 million Pakistanis [7] (11% of the population)[7] having a command over the English language, which makes it the 9th Largest English Speaking Nation[8] in the world and the 3rd largest in Asia.[7] On top of that, Pakistan produces about 445,000 university graduates and 10,000 computer science graduates per year

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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by sehrish naseer on Fri Oct 29, 2010 4:04 pm

Stages of formal education
[edit] Primary education

Only 63% of Pakistani children finish primary school education.[10] Furthermore, 68% of Pakistani boys and 72% of Pakistani girls reach grade 5.[11] The standard national system of education is mainly inspired from the British system. Pre-school education is designed for 3-5 years old and usually comprises of three stages: Play Group, Nursery and Kindergarten (also called 'KG' or 'Prep'). After pre-school education, students go through junior school from grades 1 to 4. This is proceeded by middle school from grades 5 to 8. At middle school, single-sex education is usually preferred by the community but co-education is also common in urban cities. The curriculum is usually subject to the institution. The eight commonly examined disciplines are Urdu, English, mathematics, arts, science, social studies, Islamiyat and sometimes computer studies which is subject to availability of a computer laboratory. Some institutes also give instruction in foreign languages such as Arabic, French and Chinese. The language of instruction depends on the nature of institution itself, whether it is an English-medium school or an Urdu-medium school.
[edit] Secondary education

Secondary education in Pakistan begins from grade 9 and lasts for four years. After end of each of the four school years, students are required to pass a national examination administered by a regional Board of Intermediate and Secondary Education (or BISE).

Upon completion of grade 9, students are expected to take a standardised test in each of the first parts of their academic subjects. They again give these tests of the second parts of the same courses at the end of grade 10. Upon successful completion of these two examinations, they are awarded a Secondary School Certificate (or SSC). This locally termed as 'matriculation certificate' or 'matric' for short. The curriculum usually includes a combination of eight courses including electives (such as Biology/Computing, Chemistry and Physics) as well as compulsory subjects (such as English, Urdu, Mathematics, Islamiyat and Pakistan Studies).

Students then enter an intermediate college and complete grades 11 and 12. Upon completion of each of the two grades, they again take standardised tests in their academic subjects. Upon successful completion of these examinations, students are awarded the Higher Secondary (School) Certificate (or HSC). This level of education is also called the FSc/FA or 'intermediate'. There are many streams students can choose for their 11 and 12 grades, such as pre-medical, pre-engineering, humanities (or social sciences) and commerce. Each stream consists of three electives and as well as three compulsory subjects of English, Urdu, Islamiyat (grade 11 only) and Pakistan Studies (grade 12 only).

Alternative qualifications in Pakistan are also available but are maintained by other examination boards instead BISE. Most common alternative is the General Certificate of Education (or GCE), where SSC and HSC are replaced by Ordinary Level (or O Level) and Advanced Level (or A Level) respectively. Other qualifications include IGCSE which replaces SSC. GCE O Level, IGCSE and GCE AS/A Level are managed by British examination boards of CIE of the Cambridge Assessment and/or Edexcel of the Pearson PLC. Generally, 8-10 courses are selected by students at GCE O Levels and 3-5 at GCE A Levels.

Advanced Placement (or AP) is an alternative option but much less common than GCE or IGCSE. This replaces the secondary school education as 'High School Education' instead. AP exams are monitored by a North American examination board, College Board and can only be given under supervision of centers which are registered with the College Board, unlike GCE O/AS/A Level and IGCSE which can also be given privately.
[edit] Tertiary education

According to the OECD's 2009 Global Education Digest, 6.3% of Pakistanis (8.9% of males and 3.5% of females) were university graduates as of 2007.[12] Pakistan plans to increase this figure to 10% by 2015 and subsequently to 15% by 2020.[13] There is also a great deal of variety between the different age cohorts. Less than 6% of those in the age cohort 55-64 have a degree, compared to 8% in the 45-54 age cohort, 11% in the 35-44 age cohort and 16% in the age cohort 25-34.[12]

After earning their HSC, students may study in a professional college for Bachelor's degree courses such as engineering (B.Engg), medicine (MBBS), dentistry (BDS), veterinary medicine (DVM), law (LLB), architecture (B.Arch) and nursing (B.Nurs). These courses require four or five years of study. Students can also attend a university for Bachelor of Arts (BA), Bachelor of Science (BSc), Bachelor of Commerce (BCom) or Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) degree courses.

There are two types of Bachelor courses in Pakistan: Pass or Honours. Pass degree requires two years of study and students normally read three optional subjects (such as Chemistry or Economics) in addition to almost equal number of compulsory subjects (such as English and Pakistan Studies). Honours degree requires three or four years of study, and students normally specialize in a chosen field of study, such as Biochemistry (BSc Hons. Biochemistry). It can be noted that Pass Bachelors is now slowly being phased out for Honours throughout the country.[citation needed]
[edit] Quaternary education

Many Master's degree programs only require one and a half years of study. Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) education is also available in selected areas and is usually pursued after earning an Master's degree. Students pursuing PhD degrees must choose a specific field and a university that is doing research work in that field. PhD education in Pakistan requires at least 3–5 years of study.[citation needed]

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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by sehrish naseer on Fri Oct 29, 2010 4:07 pm

The system of education is at lower level in pakistan rather than other countries....

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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by Ali on Sat Oct 30, 2010 12:22 am

sehrish naseer wrote:The system of education is at lower level in pakistan rather than other countries....

What do u mean by the lower level ?? Miss Sehrish Naseer ??

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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by Ali on Sat Oct 30, 2010 3:08 am

warda wrote:education in pakistan incaresing day by day.

What do u mean by education in pakistan increasing ?? day by day ??
justify your post please !!

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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by Ali on Sat Oct 30, 2010 3:14 am

shaguftaparveen wrote:
ICT brings a change in education in pakistan.
zarmina

What change does ICT bring ? in this particular region ??
i dont think, that ICT has brought any changes in the educational system of Pakistan ..... !

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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by sehrish naseer on Fri Nov 19, 2010 3:39 pm


Education in Pakistan is overseen by Ministry of Education of Government of Pakistan. The academic institutions are the responsibility of the provincial governments whereas the federal government mostly assists in curriculum development, accreditation and some financing of research.

The education in Pakistan is generally divided into five levels: primary (grades one through five); middle (grades six through eight); high (grades nine and ten, leading to the Secondary School Certificate or SSC); intermediate (grades eleven and twelve, leading to a Higher Secondary (School) Certificate or HSC); and university programs leading to graduate and advanced degrees.[3]

The literacy rate ranges from 87% in Islamabad to 20% in the Kohlu District[4]. Between 2000—2004, Pakistanis in the age group 55–64 had a literacy rate of almost 30%, those aged between 45–54 had a literacy rate of nearly 40%, those between 25–34 had a literacy rate of 50%, and those aged 15–24 had a literacy rate of more than 60%.[5] These data indicate that, with every passing generation, the literacy rate in Pakistan has risen by around 10%. Literacy rates vary regionally, particularly by sex. In tribal areas female literacy is 7.5%.[6] Moreover, English is fast spreading in Pakistan, with 18 million Pakistanis [7] (11% of the population)[7] having a command over the English language, which makes it the 9th Largest English Speaking Nation[8] in the world and the 3rd largest in Asia.[7] On top of that, Pakistan produces about 445,000 university graduates and 10,000 computer science graduate per year....

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