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Education in Pakistan

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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by hina khalid on Tue Oct 26, 2010 7:26 am

Pakistan schools are the proof of the improving standard of education in Pakistan. Much has been done to haul up the education in the country. Education is a must for eradicating poverty and ushering in prosperity and sound judgment among the citizens. The education ministry of Pakistan has drawn up several plans and policies that have been of much help in improving the condition of education in Pakistan. LIST OF SOME PAKISTAN SCHOOLS
A.P.High School - Sialkot
Albaseerat High School - Lahore
Aizar School System - Lahore
Al Hayat Qadaria Science High School - Sialkot
B.V.S Parsi High School - Karachi
Aitchison Model School - Karachi
Army public school and college - Sialkot
Cadet College Kohat
Alpina School - Bahawalpur
Capt. Aamir Shaheed School
Beacon House School System - Lahore
Dabistan-e-Fun - Karachi
Dewan Daffodils High School
British Overseas School Association - Karachi
Eden Grammar School - Faisalabad
Elementary Montessori School - Islamabad
Drake & Herzog School System
Elite English School - Larkana
Cynosure - Gulshan-e-Iqbal, North Karachi
Dawn Public School
Froebel's International School - Islamabad
Eton House Grammar School - Karachi
English Foundation School - Lahore
Ghazali Higher Secondary School - Gujrat
Garrison Boys High School - Lahore cantt
Govt. Central Model High School - Lahore
Ghazali School System - Lahore
Gondal Public School - Gujranwala
Hira School - Lahore
Habib Public School - Karachi
Govt.Comprehensive School - Multan
International School of Karachi
There are several schools in all the major cities and important places of Pakistan. All these schools follow the international standards of education and give proper training to the students about subjects like Science, Mathematics, English and Arts.


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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by Afsheen Sharif on Tue Oct 26, 2010 7:26 am

System of Education in Pakistan

Education is organized into five levels: primary (grades one through five); middle (grades six through eight); high (grades nine and ten, culminating in matriculation); intermediate (grades eleven and twelve, leading to an F.A. diploma in arts or F.S. science; and university programs leading to undergraduate and advanced degrees. Preparatory classes (kachi, or nursery) were formally incorporated into the system in 1988 with the Seventh Five-Year Plan.

Academic and technical education institutions are the responsibility of the federal Ministry of Education, which coordinates instruction through the intermediate level. Above that level, a designated university in each province is responsible for coordination of instruction and examinations. In certain cases, a different ministry may oversee specialized programs. Universities enjoy limited autonomy; their finances are overseen by a University Grants Commission, as in Britain.

Teacher-training workshops are overseen by the respective provincial education ministries in order to improve teaching skills. However, incentives are severely lacking, and, perhaps because of the shortage of financial support to education, few teachers participate. Rates of absenteeism among teachers are high in general, inducing support for community-coordinated efforts promoted in the Eighth Five-Year Plan (1993-98).

In 1991 there were 87,545 primary schools, 189,200 primary school teachers, and 7,768,000 students enrolled at the primary level, with a student-to-teacher ratio of forty-one to one. Just over one-third of all children of primary school age were enrolled in a school in 1989. There were 11,978 secondary schools, 154,802 secondary school teachers, and 2,995,000 students enrolled at the secondary level, with a student-to- teacher ratio of nineteen to one.

Primary school dropout rates remained fairly consistent in the 1970s and 1980s, at just over 50 percent for boys and 60 percent for girls. The middle school dropout rates for boys and girls rose from 22 percent in 1976 to about 33 percent in 1983. However, a noticeable shift occurred in the beginning of the 1980s regarding the postprimary dropout rate: whereas boys and girls had relatively equal rates (14 percent) in 1975, by 1979-- just as Zia initiated his government's Islamization program--the dropout rate for boys was 25 percent while for girls it was only 16 percent. By 1993 this trend had dramatically reversed, and boys had a dropout rate of only 7 percent compared with the girls' rate of 15 percent.

The Seventh Five-Year Plan envisioned that every child five years and above would have access to either a primary school or a comparable, but less comprehensive, mosque school. However, because of financial constraints, this goal was not achieved.

In drafting the Eighth Five-Year Plan in 1992, the government therefore reiterated the need to mobilize a large share of national resources to finance education. To improve access to schools, especially at the primary level, the government sought to decentralize and democratize the design and implemention of its education strategy. To give parents a greater voice in running schools, it planned to transfer control of primary and secondary schools to NGOs. The government also intended to gradually make all high schools, colleges, and universities autonomous, although no schedule was specified for achieving this ambitious goal.

Female Education
Comparison of data for men and women reveals significant disparity in educational attainment. By 1992, among people older than fifteen years of age, 22 percent of women were literate, compared with 49 percent of men. The comparatively slow rate of improvement for women is reflected in the fact that between 1980 and 1989, among women aged fifteen to twenty-four, 25 percent were literate. United Nations sources say that in 1990 for every 100 girls of primary school age there were only thirty in school; among girls of secondary school age, only thirteen out of 100 were in school; and among girls of the third level, grades nine and ten, only 1.5 out of 100 were in school. Slightly higher estimates by the National Education Council for 1990 stated that 2.5 percent of students--3 percent of men and 2 percent of women- -between the ages of seventeen and twenty-one were enrolled at the degree level. Among all people over twenty-five in 1992, women averaged a mere 0.7 year of schooling compared with an average of 2.9 years for men.

The discrepancy between rural and urban areas is even more marked. In 1981 only 7 percent of women in rural areas were literate, compared with 35 percent in urban areas. Among men, these rates were 27 and 57 percent, respectively. Pakistan's low female literacy rates are particularly confounding because these rates are analogous to those of some of the poorest countries in the world.

Pakistan has never had a systematic, nationally coordinated effort to improve female primary education, despite its poor standing. It was once assumed that the reasons behind low female school enrollments were cultural, but research conducted by the Ministry for Women's Development and a number of international donor agencies in the 1980s revealed that danger to a woman's honor was parents' most crucial concern. Indeed, reluctance to accept schooling for women turned to enthusiasm when parents in rural Punjab and rural Balochistan could be guaranteed their daughters' safety and, hence, their honor.

Reform Efforts
Three initiatives characterized reform efforts in education in the late 1980s and early 1990s: privatization of schools that had been nationalized in the 1970s; a return to English as the medium of instruction in the more elite of these privatized schools, reversing the imposition of Urdu in the 1970s; and continuing emphasis on Pakistan studies and Islamic studies in the curriculum.

Until the late 1970s, a disproportionate amount of educational spending went to the middle and higher levels. Education in the colonial era had been geared to staffing the civil service and producing an educated elite that shared the values of and was loyal to the British. It was unabashedly elitist, and contemporary education--reforms and commissions on reform notwithstanding--has retained the same quality. This fact is evident in the glaring gap in educational attainment between the country's public schools and the private schools, which were nationalized in the late 1970s in a move intended to facilitate equal access. Whereas students from lower-class backgrounds did gain increased access to these private schools in the 1980s and 1990s, teachers and school principals alike bemoaned the decline in the quality of education. Meanwhile, it appears that a greater proportion of children of the elites are traveling abroad not only for university education but also for their high school diplomas.

The extension of literacy to greater numbers of people has spurred the working class to aspire to middle-class goals such as owning an automobile, taking summer vacations, and providing a daughter with a once-inconceivable dowry at the time of marriage. In the past, Pakistan was a country that the landlords owned, the army ruled, and the bureaucrats governed, and it drew most of its elite from these three groups. In the 1990s, however, the army and the civil service were drawing a greater proportion of educated members from poor backgrounds than ever before.

One of the education reforms of the 1980s was an increase in the number of technical schools throughout the country. Those schools that were designated for females included hostels nearby to provide secure housing for female students. Increasing the number of technical schools was a response to the high rate of underemployment that had been evident since the early 1970s. The Seventh Five-Year Plan aimed to increase the share of students going to technical and vocational institutions to over 33 percent by increasing the number of polytechnics, commercial colleges, and vocational training centers. Although the numbers of such institutions did increase, a compelling need to expand vocational training further persisted in early 1994.


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education in pakistan

Post by Mehdi hassan on Tue Oct 26, 2010 7:27 am

The purpose of this research article is to investigate the key issues,
problems and the new challenges in Pakistan. Education plays the role
of leadership in the society. The functions of the educational institutions
are to develop the people physically, mentally, psychologically, socially,
and spiritually. It improves and promotes the economic, social, political
and cultural life of the nation. Until now the role of secondary and
college education in Pakistan has been simply preparation for tertiary
education, which in the minds of most people means strictly a university
education. All over the world universities are guiding and co-operating
with the industrial and agricultural development organizations and they
are developing their economics rapidly and meaningfully. There is a
close link between education and development. In Pakistan, after more
than five decades, the developmental indicators are not showing positive
results. The participation rate at higher education is low comparatively
to other countries of the region. There are problems of quality of staff,
students, library and laboratory. Relevance with society needs, research
facilities, financial crisis, arts students more than science students,
weaknesses of examination, ineffective governance and academic results
are not at par with international standards. Considering the gigantic
problems of education in Pakistan,

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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by tariq aziz on Tue Oct 26, 2010 7:28 am

malikfurqan wrote:Education in Pakistan A White Paper (Revised) -February 2007
- vi -
ACRONYMS
AIOU Allama Iqbal Open University
ABES Adult Basic Education Society
B.A Bachelor of Arts
B.Ed Bachelor of Education
B.Sc Bachelor of Science
CSOs Civil Society Organizations
CT Certificate of Teaching
DA Daily Allowance
ECE Early Childhood Education
ECCE Early Childhood Care and Education
EFA Education for All
EMIS Education Management Information System
ESR Education Sector Reforms
ESRA Education Sector Reforms Assistance (Programme of USAID)
F.A Faculty of Arts
GDP Gross Domestic Product
GTZ German Technical Cooperation
HEC Higher Education Commission
ICT Information Communication Technology
ICT Islamabad Capital Territory
IDSP Institute for Development Studies and Practices
IER Institute of Education and Research
IME Institute of Mass Education
IT Information Technology
Katchi Pre-Primary Class
M.A Master of Arts
MIS Management Information System
MDGs Millennium Development Goals
MoE Ministry of Education
M.Sc Master of Science
NAVTEC National Vocational and Technical Education Commission
NEAS National Education Assessment System
NFBE Non Formal Basic Education
NFE Non Formal Education
NLA National Language Authority
NWFP North West Frontier Province
PACADE Pakistan Association for Continuing Adult Education
Ph.D Doctor of Philosophy
PTC Primary Teaching Certificate
SCSPEB Society for Community Support for Primary Education in Balochistan
TA Travel Allowance
TEVT Technical Education and Vocational Training
TVE Technical and Vocational Education
UDC Upper Division Clerk
UNESCO United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization


what is your statement?please explain it.

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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by samra on Tue Oct 26, 2010 7:28 am

"what is literacy rate of education in pakistan?
tariq aziz"




Since 1991 the national literacy rate for age 10 and above has surged from 35% to 53% in 2004-5. Primary enrollment is on the up and the concept of girl’s education is now widely accepted - if often unaffordable. Buoyed by progress, Pakistan now predicts an 85% nationwide literacy rate by 2015 and 100% enrollment for every child across the nation. But are these goals achievable?


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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by hina khalid on Tue Oct 26, 2010 7:29 am

Education is considered as the cheapest defence of a nation. But the down trodden condition of education in Pakistan bears an ample testimony of the fact that it is unable to defend its own sector. Though 62 years have been passed and 23 policies and action plans have been introduced yet the educational sector is waiting for an arrival of a saviour. The government of Pervaiz Musharraf invested heavily in education sector and that era saw a visible positive educational change in Pakistani society. Now a days, the economic situation in Pakistan is under stress and education is the worse effected sector in Pakistan. The Constitution of Islamic Republic of Pakistan says,

“The state of Pakistan shall remove illiteracy and provide free and compulsory secondary education within minimum possible period.”


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Rukhsana Anwer

Post by Rukhsana Anwer on Tue Oct 26, 2010 7:29 am


At independence, Pakistan had a poorly educated population and few schools or universities. Although the education system has expanded greatly since then, debate continues about the curriculum, and, except in a few elite institutions, quality remained a crucial concern of educators in the early 1990s.

Adult literacy is low, but improving. In 1992 more than 36 percent of adults over fifteen were literate, compared with 21 percent in 1970. The rate of improvement is highlighted by the 50 percent literacy achieved among those aged fifteen to nineteen in 1990. School enrollment also increased, from 19 percent of those aged six to twenty-three in 1980 to 24 percent in 1990. However, by 1992 the population over twenty-five had a mean of only 1.9 years of schooling. This fact explains the minimal criteria for being considered literate: having the ability to both read and write (with understanding) a short, simple statement on everyday life.

Relatively limited resources have been allocated to education, although there has been improvement in recent decades. In 1960 public expenditure on education was only 1.1 percent of the gross national product (GNP); by 1990 the figure had risen to 3.4 percent. This amount compared poorly with the 33.9 percent being spent on defense in 1993. In 1990 Pakistan was tied for fourth place in the world in its ratio of military expenditures to health and education expenditures. Although the government enlisted the assistance of various international donors in the education efforts outlined in its Seventh Five-Year Plan (1988-93), the results did not measure up to expectations.

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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by muneeba hassan on Tue Oct 26, 2010 7:30 am

Education in Pakistan

A time has therefore come to shed our personal prejudices, treat Pakistan as an independent,
sovereign State and not hang on to the coattails of one foreign ideology or the other, free ourselves of
dogmas and to chart a path where the entire citizenry of Pakistan will be prompted, through a
sensible education system, to realize personal and collective goals of individual and social
empowerment. We cannot continue to postpone common sense and for political considerations
pursue one motive or the other, leading the people into a slumber of inactivity and leaving the State
entirely in the hands of self-styled elite. This does not guarantee the greatest good of the largest
number. It is against this background that we feel that a realization and articulation of national goals
in the field of education cannot be postponed. The State must invest intensively and extensively in
the future of Pakistan’s nation, by setting goals and standards in education that will facilitate the
outstanding raw human resource of this country to chisel and refine itself into the finest exponents of
social and economic power that they can be

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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by hina khalid on Tue Oct 26, 2010 7:30 am

In modern era role of education has been changed. In the past education was
considered as a tool for human development. At this age, it is considered as a tool of
development in vast meanings such as economical development, social development and
also development of human resources.
Education sector is not an island. It is necessarily part and parcel of any society. The
overall atmosphere and poor condition of a society is, the lower the standard of education
will be.
Nevertheless, the present situation of higher education in Pakistan may be explained as
was explained some years back by the then chief economist in the Planning Commission
of Pakistan who says:
“The relevance of the curriculum, the availability of pedagogical equipment and
attractive facilities and above all the skills and interest of the tutors need
improvement.”

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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by Afsheen Sharif on Tue Oct 26, 2010 7:31 am

Adult literacy is low, but improving. In 1992 more than 36 percent of adults over fifteen were literate, compared with 21 percent in 1970. The rate of improvement is highlighted by the 50 percent literacy achieved among those aged fifteen to nineteen in 1990. School enrollment also increased, from 19 percent of those aged six to twenty-three in 1980 to 24 percent in 1990. However, by 1992 the population over twenty-five had a mean of only 1.9 years of schooling. This fact explains the minimal criteria for being considered literate: having the ability to both read and write (with understanding) a short, simple statement on everyday life.


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Rukhsana Anwer

Post by Rukhsana Anwer on Tue Oct 26, 2010 7:33 am


Primary Education in Pakistan
Primary education which marks the start of formal education in a child’s life begins when a child turn to around 5 years of age. First five years of school are referred as primary. The next three years are referred as middle and further next as high school.

In general, children in Pakistan start attending school at the age of three years. These children are admitted into pre – school also called Montessori or kindergarten.


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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by Afsheen Sharif on Tue Oct 26, 2010 7:33 am

Education is organized into five levels: primary (grades one through five); middle (grades six through eight); high (grades nine and ten, culminating in matriculation); intermediate (grades eleven and twelve, leading to an F.A. diploma in arts or F.S. science; and university programs leading to undergraduate and advanced degrees. Preparatory classes (kachi, or nursery) were formally incorporated into the system in 1988 with the Seventh Five-Year Plan.


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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by shaguftaparveen on Tue Oct 26, 2010 7:33 am

The education in Pakistan is generally divided into five levels: primary (grades one through five); middle (grades six through eight); high (grades nine and ten, leading to the Secondary School Certificate or SSC); intermediate (grades eleven and twelve, leading to a Higher Secondary (School) Certificate or HSC); and university programs leading to graduate and advanced degrees.[3]
From zarmina

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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by Afsheen Sharif on Tue Oct 26, 2010 7:33 am

Education is organized into five levels: primary (grades one through five); middle (grades six through eight); high (grades nine and ten, culminating in matriculation); intermediate (grades eleven and twelve, leading to an F.A. diploma in arts or F.S. science; and university programs leading to undergraduate and advanced degrees. Preparatory classes (kachi, or nursery) were formally incorporated into the system in 1988 with the Seventh Five-Year Plan.


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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by muneeba hassan on Tue Oct 26, 2010 7:33 am

Female Education in pakistan.
Comparison of data for men and women reveals significant disparity in educational attainment. By 1992, among people older than fifteen years of age, 22 percent of women were literate, compared with 49 percent of men. The comparatively slow rate of improvement for women is reflected in the fact that between 1980 and 1989, among women aged fifteen to twenty-four, 25 percent were literate. United Nations sources say that in 1990 for every 100 girls of primary school age there were only thirty in school; among girls of secondary school age, only thirteen out of 100 were in school; and among girls of the third level, grades nine and ten, only 1.5 out of 100 were in school. Slightly higher estimates by the National Education Council for 1990 stated that 2.5 percent of students--3 percent of men and 2 percent of women- -between the ages of seventeen and twenty-one were enrolled at the degree level. Among all people over twenty-five in 1992, women averaged a mere 0.7 year of schooling compared with an average of 2.9 years for men.

The discrepancy between rural and urban areas is even more marked. In 1981 only 7 percent of women in rural areas were literate, compared with 35 percent in urban areas. Among men, these rates were 27 and 57 percent, respectively. Pakistan's low female literacy rates are particularly confounding because these rates are analogous to those of some of the poorest countries in the world.

Pakistan has never had a systematic, nationally coordinated effort to improve female primary education, despite its poor standing. It was once assumed that the reasons behind low female school enrollments were cultural, but research conducted by the Ministry for Women's Development and a number of international donor agencies in the 1980s revealed that danger to a woman's honor was parents' most crucial concern. Indeed, reluctance to accept schooling for women turned to enthusiasm when parents in rural Punjab and rural Balochistan could be guaranteed their daughters' safety and, hence, their honor.


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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by tariq aziz on Tue Oct 26, 2010 7:34 am

samra wrote:Education in Pakistan is overseen by Ministry of Education of Government of Pakistan. The academic institutions are the responsibility of the provincial governments whereas the federal government mostly assists in curriculum development, accreditation and some financing of research.

The education in Pakistan is generally divided into five levels: primary (grades one through five); middle (grades six through eight); high (grades nine and ten, leading to the Secondary School Certificate or SSC); intermediate (grades eleven and twelve, leading to a Higher Secondary (School) Certificate or HSC); and university programs leading to graduate and advanced degrees.[3]

what are study programe start in university level ?
tariq aziz and rao naveed

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Education in Pakistan

Post by malikfurqan on Tue Oct 26, 2010 7:34 am

1. Preamble
t is difficult to argue with the inference that the purpose behind the creation and development of
human life is essentially the march of human society towards high pedestals of civilization,
through a continuing process. Human history thus far testifies that knowledge is the key driver of
human development, enabling it to add value to civilized life. Knowledge is essentially the product of
education, only a rare and few have been endowed in history with the capacity to gain knowledge
through intuition. Societies that emphasize education have historically prospered in comparison with
those who relish the comfort of ignorance, confining themselves to a cocoon of benign inactivity
which retards growth. Ever since societies developed into states, it has been the obligation of the
independent State to recognize education as a right of the citizen. Therefore, States have always
encouraged education and provided education directly, as far as possible. With the renaissance driven
by the Muslim scholars of the early centuries of the second millennium, the world realized that
human kind had to be the main focus of human enquiry and, thus, enquiry into human life and the
environment concerning it has made it possible for humanity to reach the state of knowledge which it
finds itself endowed with today. There is no possibility of societies and States, desiring to respond to
the changing demands of growth not to invest individually, socially and materially in education to
embark on a path of progress and realize their potential in the comity of nations. An unwillingness to
respond to change through acquisition of knowledge degenerates society – faith degenerating into
dogma, legacy degenerating into nostalgia and commitment to ideas degenerating into obduracy.
Education therefore is the undeniable driver of the engine of progress.

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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by khuram on Tue Oct 26, 2010 7:36 am

Educating: the imparting and acquiring of knowledge through teaching and learning, especially at a school or similar institution.........

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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by tariq aziz on Tue Oct 26, 2010 7:37 am

Afsheen Sharif wrote:Education is organized into five levels: primary (grades one through five); middle (grades six through eight); high (grades nine and ten, culminating in matriculation); intermediate (grades eleven and twelve, leading to an F.A. diploma in arts or F.S. science; and university programs leading to undergraduate and advanced degrees. Preparatory classes (kachi, or nursery) were formally incorporated into the system in 1988 with the Seventh Five-Year Plan.

why computer not used in pakistan for study in school level?
tariq aziz and rao naveed

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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by khuram on Tue Oct 26, 2010 7:38 am

learning experience: an informative experience
"Spending a weekend in their house was a real education."

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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by muneeba hassan on Tue Oct 26, 2010 7:38 am

The Higher Education Triple-Whammy
Pakistan's investment in public sector higher education (catering to over 85% of all enrolled tertiary students) fell from 19% of the educational development budget in 1972 to 10% in 1988, despite an overall increase in the educational budget. The country is actually spending less and less on higher education even though it continues to pump in more money into primary education (with questionable results). As salt on the wound, the cost of higher education in Pakistan is far higher than comparable countries (TFHE). Pakistan's expenditure per student on tertiary education was 123 percent of GNP per capita in 1990, and 94 percent in 1996. By contrast, the S Asian averages were 91.4 percent of regional GNP per capita in 1990 and 72.8 percent in 1996. So, Pakistanis actually pay more for tertiary education than they can afford compared to other developing countries in the region, who end up producing more capable and competitive graduates(4).

The second higher education twist is what some have referred to as "educational apartheid". Parallel systems have evolved to prepare different classes in society for different levels of education and, hence, for different positions within society. Private sector tertiary education, although still lagging behind regional standards, involves a greater investment in students and produces better graduates to compete in the market.

The growing disparity between a minority elite and majority dispossessed in the country is expressing itself in various ways in the country, some of them violent. Security experts have argued convincingly, and sometimes with empirical evidence that the rise of militancy in the country is a direct, virtually inevitable consequence of developmental inequality, particularly in the education sector.

A third, slightly more complex, argument can be made with respect to the definition of Pakistani "society" and where it is going. In a sense, the TFHE brings out the fact that the "highly" educated are now forming a global elite, drawing their strength from a globalizing, service-based economy and engaged in defining where humankind goes in the next generation or two. Part of this definition is to place a premium on higher education itself, at which the TFHE points out the promise for developing countries who begin to invest in higher education now. But at a deeper level, the well-recognized cultural crisis Pakistani society is facing now emphasizes the need for intellectual direction and leadership, which may be provided by the "highly" educated.

This last can be placed in the context of socio-linguists, such as Dr. Tariq Rahman(5), who argue convincingly of the social distinction inherent in a literacy-based society. The extension of this argument, which is what TFHE propounds, is that a society based on knowledge will create its own social distinctions on the basis of higher education. "Social distinctions" take the form of power structures embedded in societal norms and transmissions, constructing a definition of "the way things are".

Almost as an addendum, the post-modern condition of ideas needs to be added to the higher education challenge looming above Pakistani society. Today's world, characterized by the unprecedented rate of information and communication flows, has reduced the half-life of popular concepts to about the time it takes to switch to a new cable channel or say "www". The speed at which knowledge is produced and disseminated is itself a feature of this age, more than just the variety of ideas. In this post-modern feeding frenzy, more and more emphasis is being placed on so-called "process skills": communication, adaptability, negotiation-ability and the like, to complement a basic knowledge set. Everybody is forced to compete in the world, whether from their "home" or outside. Pakistani graduates, too, must compete in the world armed with a basic set of knowledge and process skills, if they are to adapt to this pace

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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by khuram on Tue Oct 26, 2010 7:38 am

Study of teaching: the study of the theories and practices of teaching
"a degree in education"

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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by khuram on Tue Oct 26, 2010 7:39 am

system for educating people: the system of educating people in a community or society
"jobs in education"

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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by malikfurqan on Tue Oct 26, 2010 7:39 am

warda wrote:
malikfurqan wrote:Education in Pakistan A White Paper (Revised) -February 2007
- vi -
ACRONYMS
AIOU Allama Iqbal Open University
ABES Adult Basic Education Society
B.A Bachelor of Arts
B.Ed Bachelor of Education
B.Sc Bachelor of Science
CSOs Civil Society Organizations
CT Certificate of Teaching
DA Daily Allowance
ECE Early Childhood Education
ECCE Early Childhood Care and Education
EFA Education for All
EMIS Education Management Information System
ESR Education Sector Reforms
ESRA Education Sector Reforms Assistance (Programme of USAID)
F.A Faculty of Arts
GDP Gross Domestic Product
GTZ German Technical Cooperation
HEC Higher Education Commission
ICT Information Communication Technology
ICT Islamabad Capital Territory
IDSP Institute for Development Studies and Practices
IER Institute of Education and Research
IME Institute of Mass Education
IT Information Technology
Katchi Pre-Primary Class
M.A Master of Arts
MIS Management Information System
MDGs Millennium Development Goals
MoE Ministry of Education
M.Sc Master of Science
NAVTEC National Vocational and Technical Education Commission
NEAS National Education Assessment System
NFBE Non Formal Basic Education
NFE Non Formal Education
NLA National Language Authority
NWFP North West Frontier Province
PACADE Pakistan Association for Continuing Adult Education
Ph.D Doctor of Philosophy
PTC Primary Teaching Certificate
SCSPEB Society for Community Support for Primary Education in Balochistan
TA Travel Allowance
TEVT Technical Education and Vocational Training
TVE Technical and Vocational Education
UDC Upper Division Clerk
ANS:
these r levels of higher education................................
UNESCO United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization
plz sumrize ur definati on furqan

malikfurqan

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Age : 29

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Re: Education in Pakistan

Post by shaguftaparveen on Tue Oct 26, 2010 7:40 am

hina khalid wrote:education in pakistan is in form of ict is in very infency stage.education increase day by day if we see in the early days the litracy rate was very low and now its very improved.
who can we increase the litracy rate in pakistan?
From zarmina

shaguftaparveen

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Re: Education in Pakistan

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